The Swarm – Arthur Herzog (Review)

Everyone has heard of killer bees – a mutant strain of honeybees known for their aggression, killing and attacking humans without provocation. This book, and the film it inspired, are part of the reason for that. In reality, although killer bees are aggressive, they kill only a few people a year.

In The Swarm, two people are dead by page 6. Not content with this initial assault, the bees embark on a campaign of aggression, culminating in their (successful) occupation and pacification of New York. And these aren’t even normal killer bees – they’re a mutation on top of a mutation, with all sorts of new deadly tricks.

This is a very strange book. It doesn’t really belong amongst all the other books where mutated monsters attack, because it’s not focused on the personal, or even really on the monster. This is a book about societal collapse, about humanity’s failures in the face of a threat that it doesn’t fully understand. As the bee menace grows, America falls apart, and a lot of that fall is entirely self-inflicted – people ignore sensible advice, choose the wrong hills to die on and then actually do. Not to be all current-events-y, but I found the human response to the external threat here a lot more well observed than I think I would have felt last year.

While there are central characters, it’s a stretch to call any of them a true protagonist; the viewpoint shifts around frequently, and is most commonly detached, with the tone of a historian. The most arguably-central of characters is a rather bland scientist who is not actually involved in much of the action, but who thinks a lot about it. Characterisation occurs, but lop-sidedly; there’s a romantic subplot, and various evolving interpersonal subplots, but the beats are in all the wrong places: the character side of things starts strong, gets dropped for a while, and then returns only to fizzle out well before the end.

Other than the giant bees attacking New York, this reads like non-fiction – the narration is dry, clinical, passionless. Bee behaviour is reported without any real attempt to draw out emotion from you, and the focus is on the mechanics of the invasion, not its consequences. This is the book I would expected to be reading if bees actually had attacked the USA.

The impression of non-fiction is strengthened by the diagrams and references scattered throughout. I was unable to locate the specific papers referred to, but I think that was a failure of search engines – for the few examples I tried, I found that those researchers did exist and were writing on the right topics at the right time. Herzog has clearly done a vast amount of research into bee biology and behaviour, and it’s often hard to distinguish exactly where the narrative shifts away from reality.

The plot moves in fits and starts, with moments of rapid progression interspersed with long, detailed descriptions of beekeeping processes or – in one extremely bizarre passage – the full narration of a minor character’s interaction with a computer. Every line of text displayed on his screen is reported as he muses about the correct inputs and slowly researches an unknown chemical; it might be the most tortuously stretched-out narration that I’ve ever read. When he finally finds a plot-relevant answer, he keeps it to himself and it isn’t mentioned again for a few chapters.

This book is of its time (1978), which means that it’s casually bigoted but wouldn’t think of itself as such. There’s a highly-qualified female character taking centre stage, but all the characters would rather leer than listen to her vital information. Men with high-pitched voices or shorter statures are shown to still have value, but their particular physical characteristics just keep on being mentioned negatively. There’s no outright xenophobia going on, but little touches of American exceptionalism shine through, along with fears of various shifty foreign powers.

Endearingly and accidentally, the book sounds far more racist than it actually is: killer bees are ‘Africanised’ honey bees (an actual real-world term), but Herzog often finds that too taxing to write. Instead, page after page is filled with comments about the dangers of the Africans swarming over here, taking over our fields and poisoning our women. I genuinely do think this is not intended to be a clunky metaphor: it’s not stark enough for how heavy-handed it would have to be. The actual main theme of the book is humanity’s relationship with nature, but if you picked a sentence at random you’d probably end up with a very different interpretation.

This was an odd read. I quite liked several things about its approach – the non-fiction trappings add an air of realism to a genre that often lacks it, and I’m always in favour of an author who is brimming with highly-specific minutiae. The decline of a country under an existential threat is well-observed. As a narrative though, and from an emotional impact point-of-view, the whole thing falls rather flat. It’s worth reading, I think, but I wouldn’t come back to it.

Buy it here.

The Cavern – Alister Hodge (Review)

When the opal miners heard strange tapping sounds in the tunnels, they thought it was a subterranean creature stalking them. They called it the “miners’ mother” and left offerings of blood to keep it away. Now the mines are closed, the offerings neglected and a long-dormant creature stirs hungrily in the dark.

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The Nest – Gregory Douglas (Review)

The small fishing community on Yarkie Island leads a peaceful, picturesque existence, far from the bustle of the modern world. Simple, honest folk lead the same simple lives as the generations before them

The only part of Yarkie that isn’t picturesque is the local dump. Here, modern pesticides have created something far worse than the squabbling rats. Something organised, and hungry, and filled with hate.

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Squelch, Slither, & Slime – John Halkin (Review)

There are reports of new, never-before seen creatures in the South of England. At first, people think little of them, dismissing them as fictional or no more dangerous than ferrets. But the creatures grow, and multiply, and spread, their lust for human flesh increasing every day. As the death toll rises, humanity is forced to confront a new and horrifying idea: we are no longer top of the food chain.

The above description applies equally well to three different books, all by John Halkin, and all having a single-word title beginning with “S”. In Squelch, the menace is large, carnivorous caterpillars and poison-spitting moths. In Slither, hypnotic worms (the reptile-kind, limbless lizards) hunt humans in the sewers. And in Slime, evil hordes of jellyfish are the greatest threat humanity has ever faced.

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Crabs – Guy N. Smith (Review)

night crabs

Books about monsters rising from the oceans to wreak havoc upon humanity are some of my favourite things, and the ones that I turn to in times of stress or boredom. I have read reams of books about sharks and squid and jellyfish, but was delighted recently to discover a whole stash of books focusing on monstrous crabs. I initially intended this review to focus on one book only – Night of the Crabs – but lately I have had a lot of long & boring train journeys, so instead will focus on all eight books in the Crabs series.

Luckily, the books – all the way up to The Charnel Caves – share many common elements, and can be usefully all discussed together. The plot of each book may vary in specifics, but the core narrative is the same – gigantic, hate-filled crustaceans emerge from the oceans, and humanity must fight for its survival in the face of this new and ever-unanticipated menace.

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The Witcher (2007) – Review

The_Witcher_EU_box.jpgWitchers are mutants – monsters created to defend normal people from worse monsters. They take dangerous jobs for little pay and less thanks. Geralt of Rivia is the most famous of witchers, but he doesn’t know that – he’s forgotten all of his pasts and all of his monster-hunting knowledge.

You take on the role of Geralt as he struggles to recover his memories, do witcher work, and navigate the complex politics of a kingdom riven by sectarian and inter-species conflict. Continue reading “The Witcher (2007) – Review”

Pumpkinhead – Cullen Bunn (Review)

pumpkinheadVengeance is a common human desire and, like other human desires, also a dreadful sin. For each sin, there is a demon; the sin given flesh and summoned into the world by people who think they can survive the experience.

After a hit-and-run leaves children dead, a vengeance demon is raised to hunt down those responsible. With no other hope for survival, the demon’s victims raise demons of their own. A rural American community is torn apart – both metaphorically and literally – by inter-demon conflict.
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